How do you place a value on vacation?

Do you measure a vacation’s value by finding a good deal on airfare? Getting a chance to relax?  Spending precious time with your loved ones?  Chances are, it means different things to different people.  Over the last decade, there have been numerous studies conducted to measure the value of vacation.  The good news is that the research has found vacations are good for you—that taking regular time away has positive effects on health, well-being, job performance, relationships, and lifestyle.

The bad news is that millions of Americans each year choose to ignore the evidence.  Last year, 169 million Americans did not take all of their earned vacations days!

In a new infographic from the American Resort Development Association (ARDA), taking time to get away has important health and lifestyle benefits that, if neglected, can lead to negative consequences.  Ever hear of burnout?  Yes, research has found that people who don’t take time to reset their batteries are more likely to suffer from burnout.  Everything from work performance, added stress, strained relationships, and decreased mental stamina are among the many negative results from not taking time to get away from the everyday schedule and pace of life.

The timeshare industry and its owners say that in addition to the lasting health benefits, the pre-paid nature of ownership guarantees that you will vacation at least once a year and ensures you take future vacations.  In fact, owners save $18,160 over 18 years of vacationing with timeshare, compared to an average hotel vacation over the same time period.

But the real value of taking regular time off with loved ones is the special memories it creates.  How do you place a value on that?

ARDA-Value-Prop-2-Value-of-Vacation-090115-sm

The Value of Vacation